Tag Archives: Ernest Hemingway

Go ahead. Be a Reading Rebel.

5 Oct

I’m 4 days late, but happy belated Banned Book Week!

Go ahead, be a rebel.

I dare you.

Do it.

You know you want to!

The ALA (American Library Association) has recorded hundreds of attempts by individuals and groups to have the following “outrageous” books removed from libraries and classrooms.

Go ahead & Rock Your World with these literary temptresses if you haven’t already:

1. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
2. The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger
3. The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck
4. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
5. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
6. Ulysses, by James Joyce
7. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
8. The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
9. 1984, by George Orwell
11. Lolita, by Vladmir Nabokov
12. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
15. Catch-22, by Joseph Heller
16. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
17. Animal Farm, by George Orwell
18. The Sun Also Rises, by Ernest Hemingway
19. As I Lay Dying, by William Faulkner
20. A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway
23. Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston
24. Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison
25. Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison
26. Gone with the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell
27. Native Son, by Richard Wright
28. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, by Ken Kesey
29. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
30. For Whom the Bell Tolls, by Ernest Hemingway
33. The Call of the Wild, by Jack London
36. Go Tell it on the Mountain, by James Baldwin
38. All the King’s Men, by Robert Penn Warren
40. The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien
45. The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair
48. Lady Chatterley’s Lover, by D.H. Lawrence
49. A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
50. The Awakening, by Kate Chopin
53. In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote
55. The Satanic Verses, by Salman Rushdie
57. Sophie’s Choice, by William Styron
64. Sons and Lovers, by D.H. Lawrence
66. Cat’s Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut
67. A Separate Peace, by John Knowles
73. Naked Lunch, by William S. Burroughs
74. Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh
75. Women in Love, by D.H. Lawrence
80. The Naked and the Dead, by Norman Mailer
84. Tropic of Cancer, by Henry Miller
88. An American Tragedy, by Theodore Dreiser
97. Rabbit, Run, by John Updike

Also, check out Wikipedia’s list of Books Banned by Gov’ts around the world… here.


When Insults Had Class…

3 Oct
Julius Henry "Groucho" Marx, cropped...

Image via Wikipedia

My friends and I email each other inspirational quotes from famous and anonymous mouths to help us through a hard time, illuminate great times, make us laugh or just find something to relate to in our lives. We find them in movies, poems, or even real life.

When I checked my inbox this morning and found a friend had shared a poignant and funny list of kick-a** insult quotes, I thought it was great inspiration from real characters on how to get your point across in fiction (even if it’s not a nice one) in the most eloquent way possible.

If you have a ornery character or just need an epic comeback for one of your characters (or yourself), I hope you can find inspiration in these beautiful, yet caustic quotes…haha

When Insults Had Class

These glorious insults are from an era before the English language got boiled down to 4-letter words.

The exchange between Churchill & Lady Astor:
She said, “If you were my husband I’d give you poison.”
He said, “If you were my wife, I’d drink it.”

A member of Parliament to Disraeli: “Sir, you will either die on the gallows or of some unspeakable disease.” 
“That depends, Sir,” said Disraeli, “whether I embrace your policies or your mistress.”

“He had delusions of adequacy.” – Walter Kerr 

“He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire.” – Winston Churchill 

“I have never killed a man, but I have read many obituaries with great pleasure.”  Clarence Darrow 

“He has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary.” –William Faulkner (about Ernest Hemingway). 

“Thank you for sending me a copy of your book; I’ll waste no time reading it.” – Moses Hadas 

“I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it.” – Mark Twain 

“He has no enemies, but is intensely disliked by his friends..” – Oscar Wilde 

“I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a friend…. if you have one.” – George Bernard Shaw to Winston Churchill 
“Cannot possibly attend first night, will attend second…. if there is one.” –  Winston Churchill, in response.

“I feel so miserable without you; it’s almost like having you here.” – Stephen Bishop 

“He is a self-made man and worships his creator.” – John Bright 

“I’ve just learned about his illness. Let’s hope it’s nothing trivial.” – Irvin S. Cobb 

“He is not only dull himself; he is the cause of dullness in others.” – Samuel Johnson 

“He is simply a shiver looking for a spine to run up.” – Paul Keating 

“In order to avoid being called a flirt, she always yielded easily.” – Charles, Count Talleyrand 

“He loves nature in spite of what it did to him.” – Forrest Tucker 

“Why do you sit there looking like an envelope without any address on it?” – Mark Twain 

“His mother should have thrown him away and kept the stork.” – Mae West 

“Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go..” – Oscar Wilde 

“He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp-posts.. . for support rather than illumination. ” – Andrew Lang (1844-1912) 

“He has Van Gogh’s ear for music.” – Billy Wilder 

“I’ve had a perfectly wonderful evening. But this wasn’t it.” – Groucho Marx

%d bloggers like this: