Tag Archives: reading

And She Was – Page turner, thriller – Coming March 2012

9 Feb

I just put down And She Was by Alison Gaylin and it is with pure satisfaction that I do so. This book, from the very first pages, has proven to be an addiction. For days I had been passing by it at work, reading the same first few pages over and over again when I decided to pick it up and read it start to finish. My first idea was to save it for my upcoming travels – some very long flights ahead – but “Oh, only one chapter” turned into “Oh, only the first 100 pages” which then turned into me, in the middle of the night, 3 hours with my eyes glued open and only ten pages to go. I promise you…it was THAT good.

Absolutely captivating. A page-turner.

Normally, my recreational reading revolves around humorous memoirs, chick lit,  and some historical fiction. Mystery-thrillers usually aren’t my go-to because I get so engrossed in the novel that I scare myself silly if I’m reading any time after 7 at night and this book was no exception to that rule. Let’s just say that at 1 am two nights ago I could have sworn someone was breaking in to kidnap someone in my home. No, no, not irrational at all :-O My unwarranted fears only prove that Gaylin is very effective at creating nail-biting, page-turning suspense magic with her words. Take  a peek at her website: http://www.alisongaylin.com. She has penned several other mystery novels that I will need to check out of the library ASAP since I already devoured As She Was and loved it.

Happy Reading!

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Go ahead. Be a Reading Rebel.

5 Oct

I’m 4 days late, but happy belated Banned Book Week!

Go ahead, be a rebel.

I dare you.

Do it.

You know you want to!

The ALA (American Library Association) has recorded hundreds of attempts by individuals and groups to have the following “outrageous” books removed from libraries and classrooms.

Go ahead & Rock Your World with these literary temptresses if you haven’t already:

1. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
2. The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger
3. The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck
4. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
5. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
6. Ulysses, by James Joyce
7. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
8. The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
9. 1984, by George Orwell
11. Lolita, by Vladmir Nabokov
12. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
15. Catch-22, by Joseph Heller
16. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
17. Animal Farm, by George Orwell
18. The Sun Also Rises, by Ernest Hemingway
19. As I Lay Dying, by William Faulkner
20. A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway
23. Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston
24. Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison
25. Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison
26. Gone with the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell
27. Native Son, by Richard Wright
28. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, by Ken Kesey
29. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
30. For Whom the Bell Tolls, by Ernest Hemingway
33. The Call of the Wild, by Jack London
36. Go Tell it on the Mountain, by James Baldwin
38. All the King’s Men, by Robert Penn Warren
40. The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien
45. The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair
48. Lady Chatterley’s Lover, by D.H. Lawrence
49. A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
50. The Awakening, by Kate Chopin
53. In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote
55. The Satanic Verses, by Salman Rushdie
57. Sophie’s Choice, by William Styron
64. Sons and Lovers, by D.H. Lawrence
66. Cat’s Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut
67. A Separate Peace, by John Knowles
73. Naked Lunch, by William S. Burroughs
74. Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh
75. Women in Love, by D.H. Lawrence
80. The Naked and the Dead, by Norman Mailer
84. Tropic of Cancer, by Henry Miller
88. An American Tragedy, by Theodore Dreiser
97. Rabbit, Run, by John Updike

Also, check out Wikipedia’s list of Books Banned by Gov’ts around the world… here.

Dr Seuss vs. Madonna : Can Celebs Write Good Children’s Books??

22 Sep

The Atlantic published a great article online titled Dr. Seuss vs. Madonna: Can Celebrities Write Good Children’s Books? Good question!

Working in the publishing industry, I’m always curious to see what the bestselling books are around the world. In the US, we have a great selection of titles by a slew of authors and a large part of them are marketed like anything else…excessively. When it comes to celebrity authors, the hype is even more exaggerated.

Normally, the titles marketed here are by American celebrities. There’s no way, I thought to myself last year, that Lauren Conrad‘s tween series “LA Candy”, “Sweet Little Lies” or “Sugar and Spice” were of any consequence outside of the realm of teenybopper Americans. Boy was I wrong! Ms. Conrad’s titles sold like hot cakes throughout Europe and the rest of the world and I had to bite my tongue. Apparently, “The Hills” wasn’t banned for its scripted impersonation of reality outside of the US…shocking! OTHER people outside of this country are watching it and swarming bookstores in the Netherlands, Germany and Spain to get a hold of her novels. I don’t really get it, but my friends who are addicted to The Hills/The City/Etc were not surprised at all. Apparently, this seemingly American reality star has made it big abroad and she’s only Lauren Conrad. Included in the article’s list are big shots like Madonna, Tyra Banks and Jimmy Buffet. Surely, they must have outsold Lauren Conrad…

Here’s a slideshow of a few titles that popped out at me from their original list:

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Readings from Around the World

14 Sep

This morning, in my mass of emails, I stumbled upon a link to this great slideshow on Flavorwire called “Essential Reading from the World’s Top Literary Cities“. I’m a lover of reading and especially of writers from around the world (currently I’ve honed in on Caribbean writers) and so this list was right up my alley.

Here is Flavorwire’s List:

  1. Tokyo, Japan
  2. New York City, USA
  3. Buenos Aires, Argentina
  4. Iowa City, USA (??? was not expecting this one!)
  5. Mumbai, India
  6. London, UK
  7. Nairobi, Kenya
  8. Paris, France
  9. San Francisco, USA

Obviously, Flavorwire couldn’t name ALL the cities filled with wonderful, successful authors, but Iowa City? Really? In some of the comments below the slide show several people chimed in to add Dublin, Ireland (very prolific literary voices come from Ireland), but I also thought about the successful writers from Brazil, Chile, Italy…I mean, come on, Umberto Eco, Dante Alighieri, Isabel Allende, Paulo Coelho…there are so many amazing authors from other metropolitan cities that weren’t listed. So, I decided to think about a few other cities I would have added to Flavorwire’s list…

  1. Madrid, Spain
  2. Sao Paolo, Brazil
  3. Florence, Italy
  4. All of the Caribbean (cheating, I know, but they’re all so good!)
  5. Stockholm, Sweden

Tower of Babel in Plaza del Martin in Buenos Aires

If you were to write your own list or just add to Flavorwire’s, which cities would make up your Top 5?

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