Tag Archives: writing

And She Was – Page turner, thriller – Coming March 2012

9 Feb

I just put down And She Was by Alison Gaylin and it is with pure satisfaction that I do so. This book, from the very first pages, has proven to be an addiction. For days I had been passing by it at work, reading the same first few pages over and over again when I decided to pick it up and read it start to finish. My first idea was to save it for my upcoming travels – some very long flights ahead – but “Oh, only one chapter” turned into “Oh, only the first 100 pages” which then turned into me, in the middle of the night, 3 hours with my eyes glued open and only ten pages to go. I promise you…it was THAT good.

Absolutely captivating. A page-turner.

Normally, my recreational reading revolves around humorous memoirs, chick lit,  and some historical fiction. Mystery-thrillers usually aren’t my go-to because I get so engrossed in the novel that I scare myself silly if I’m reading any time after 7 at night and this book was no exception to that rule. Let’s just say that at 1 am two nights ago I could have sworn someone was breaking in to kidnap someone in my home. No, no, not irrational at all :-O My unwarranted fears only prove that Gaylin is very effective at creating nail-biting, page-turning suspense magic with her words. Take  a peek at her website: http://www.alisongaylin.com. She has penned several other mystery novels that I will need to check out of the library ASAP since I already devoured As She Was and loved it.

Happy Reading!

Lack of Motivation

30 Jan

Sometimes, it’s hard to make the time to sit down and write. Period.
I’ve had teachers say that you make time for something you love and that is the pure truth. I commend professional writers who are only at the mercy of their own will power. Apparently, my will power went out the window the moment I decided to give myself some a day or two off from blogging at the holidays. Well, those few days turned into weeks and now I need to get back to it.
So, here’s what I’m going to try to work on this coming year to make sure I’m meeting my dedication to this blog and my writing projects:

1) Find a cool topic twice per week to post here on the blog
2) Take a writing class (got a Gotham 1-day intensive for my b-day, just need to use it!)
3) Use my new digital recorder to record ideas and stories lines I come up with while commuting everyday to work.

If I can keep these 3 things up, then I think I’ll be setting myself up to getting the ball rolling this year on my creative writing. It’s a resolution with a plan so according to all the New Year’s Resolution articles, it has about a 120% chance of working. Ok, I just made that up, but let’s hope it’s at least pushing 90% so I have a chance 🙂

What are your NY Resolutions? Do any of them have anything to do with your writing?

 

English: Two New Year's Resolutions postcards

Image via Wikipedia

 

Underwater Inspirations

7 Oct

Today’s inspiration: water & the amazing life that lives under the sea.

Found these beautiful pics on the worldwide web…they aren’t mine, just as an FYI.

Go ahead. Be a Reading Rebel.

5 Oct

I’m 4 days late, but happy belated Banned Book Week!

Go ahead, be a rebel.

I dare you.

Do it.

You know you want to!

The ALA (American Library Association) has recorded hundreds of attempts by individuals and groups to have the following “outrageous” books removed from libraries and classrooms.

Go ahead & Rock Your World with these literary temptresses if you haven’t already:

1. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
2. The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger
3. The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck
4. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
5. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
6. Ulysses, by James Joyce
7. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
8. The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
9. 1984, by George Orwell
11. Lolita, by Vladmir Nabokov
12. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
15. Catch-22, by Joseph Heller
16. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
17. Animal Farm, by George Orwell
18. The Sun Also Rises, by Ernest Hemingway
19. As I Lay Dying, by William Faulkner
20. A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway
23. Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston
24. Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison
25. Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison
26. Gone with the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell
27. Native Son, by Richard Wright
28. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, by Ken Kesey
29. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
30. For Whom the Bell Tolls, by Ernest Hemingway
33. The Call of the Wild, by Jack London
36. Go Tell it on the Mountain, by James Baldwin
38. All the King’s Men, by Robert Penn Warren
40. The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien
45. The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair
48. Lady Chatterley’s Lover, by D.H. Lawrence
49. A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
50. The Awakening, by Kate Chopin
53. In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote
55. The Satanic Verses, by Salman Rushdie
57. Sophie’s Choice, by William Styron
64. Sons and Lovers, by D.H. Lawrence
66. Cat’s Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut
67. A Separate Peace, by John Knowles
73. Naked Lunch, by William S. Burroughs
74. Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh
75. Women in Love, by D.H. Lawrence
80. The Naked and the Dead, by Norman Mailer
84. Tropic of Cancer, by Henry Miller
88. An American Tragedy, by Theodore Dreiser
97. Rabbit, Run, by John Updike

Also, check out Wikipedia’s list of Books Banned by Gov’ts around the world… here.

Peek into Screenwriting

21 Sep

As I mentioned last week, Gotham Writer’s Workshop (GWW) offered a set of free introductory courses in NYC on Sept 20th & 21st. The classes filled up quickly as I found out when I applied to attend a course on the 21st and was told in the next 10 minutes that it was already filled…along with almost every other course listed for that date. This place is popular and there is no shortage of writers in NYC & its periphery, so I suppose I expected it to be that hard to get into a class.

Well, in the end a friend of mine decided to take the Creative Writing 101 course on Tuesday night and I decided that I had done that already in my GWW Fiction 1 intensive last year, so I sprung for something out of my comfort zone – screenwriting.

Now, I am a movie addict. I watched ‘Titanic’ SIX times in theaters and cried every single time Kate Winslet wouldn’t let Jack on that perfectly large-enough-for-you-and-your-lover piece of debris. ANYWAY, I digress… The point I’m trying to actually make is that I love the medium of film but it had never occurred to me to write a screenplay. Sitting in this class, though, I can see myself eagerly transforming my novel into a screenplay and quite easily.

As per usual, GWW excelled in bringing a highly educated, smart, engaging teacher to this class. This time around, I had the pleasure of learning from screenwriter, novelist and director, Richard Uhlig. He attended NYU grad school and has his MFA in Screen Writing from the American Film Institute. Mr. Uhlig was very personable and in the 60-minute span had lots of insightful comments, suggestions and stories to tell. We worked through two different 5-minute writing exercises and everyone was engaged and there was great energy in the room. If I lived closer, I would definitely take his class just to learn something new. Today, in reading about him some more on his website, I learned he has also written 2 novels (covers shown below). You can read the first chapter of his second novel, “Boy Minus Girl”, on his site and it is very engaging an immediately I was transported into the life of this bored, horny teenage boy who desperately wants to hook up with his dream girl and flee Kansas as quickly as possible…and did I mention there’s a Charlie Sheen type Uncle that apparently takes him under his wing to learn the lay of the land of ladies? Oh yeah…I need to get this book asap.

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Anyway, regarding screenwriting… Here are a few tips Mr. Uhlig shared in class that I think are really useful. As a way to break some writer’s block, maybe take a step back from your project and turn a scene into a screen play to better visualize where you want your piece to go.

1) Movies are all about IMAGES. Iconic images that you remember forever. His one example was of the girl getting sucked under water by an unseen create as she swims through the water…aka JAWS.

2) In screenplays you can only write about what you can SEE and HEAR. The ‘internalization’ found in narrative can be adopted to film with voice overs, but they are what drive a movie.

3) The job of a screenwriter is to emotionally involve your audience using IMAGES. Dialogue is secondary. As with most writing, SHOW don’t TELL.

4) Screenplays are written in the PRESENT tense. “The girl is sucked under the water by an unknown creature.”

5) Visual images, songs, characters, conversations, places are all great inspiration for screenplays…and other types of writing, as well. Follow the inspirations you find and work with them to create your screenplay.

6) COMMIT to writing daily. Make a schedule. Be adamant about keeping fresh with your writing. As Mr. Uhlig said last night and I’ve heard time and again, “writing begets writing.”

7) Particularly with screenplays, DON’T write in the shots or micromanage actors. The shots are determined by the director and the actors will interpret the character as they see fit. You want to give both directors, actors and editors enough information to go on, but not too much as to stifle them.

As for me, I presented during on the five-minute writing pieces in class and I think it really is telling of my character in “Alternate Ending” so I’m going to roll with it…take inspiration where you can find it – it’s all over the place!

Happy Writing!

Workshops| New York City | 42 Free Writing Classes – Gotham Writers’ Workshop Fall Open House

15 Sep

If you’re in the NYC area take advantage of these great FREE writing courses. Gotham is excellent. I took a one-day intensive Fiction class this time last year and it really helped get the ball rolling & my mind churning with new ideas…take advantage of this deal if you can!

If you’re prepping for NANOWRIMO 2011 this November, these classes could be a great place to start getting your preparations in place for that awesome month-long creative journey!

Happy writing…

Click on the Image below to get more info!

Namely, fruit.

13 Sep
Cobb Salad

Image by saturdave via Flickr

This morning on the radio they were discussing all the different types of foods named after people. For example, the sandwich named after the Earl of Sandwich, the Cobb Salad named after Robert Howard Cobb (debatable according to Curb Your Enthusiasm haha) and so forth. One of the radio hosts has his own ice cream flavor at a local creamery made up of chocolate ice cream and the oreo-like crunchies from ice cream cakes…a WINNING combination, let me tell you.

This whole discussion got me thinking…if a food was named after me, what would it be?

Well, lately, I’ve been obsessively craving the following salad that I highly recommend:

It’s simple, but a delicious mix that hits the spot every time that I would LOVE to call the “Caroline”, but it probably already has a name as I’ve had it in several restaurants.
What food [sandwich, dish, combination] would you name after yourself??

As a writing exercise, describe your favorite food. Even better, write about a food that you loved as a kid and what that food reminds you of today. The smells of apple pie in your aunt’s house; the taste of freshly whipped cream as you licked it off your stubby little fingers. Food can reveal so much to us about the place, time, and even class of our characters in fiction that it should be used as effectively as can be to not only make our readers drool, but also understand that much more about our characters.

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